[Ebook] Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime By Sean Carroll – Dileydi.be


Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime Caltech Physicist And New York Times Bestselling Author Sean Carroll Shows That There Are Multiple Copies Of You And Everyone Else ReallySomething Deeply Hidden Begins With The News That Physics Is In A Crisis Quantum Mechanics Underlies All Of Modern Physics But Major Gaps In The Theory Have Been Ignored Since Science Popularizers Keep Telling Us How Weird It Is, How Contradictory, How Impossible It Is To Understand Academics Discourage Students From Working On The Dead End Of Quantum Foundations Putting His Professional Reputation On The Line, Carroll Says That Crisis Can Now Come To An End We Just Have To Accept That There Is Than One Of Us In The Universe There Are Many, Many Sean Carrolls Many Of Every One Of UsThe Many Worlds Theory Of Quantum Behavior Says That Every Time There Is A Quantum Event, A World Splits Off With Everything In It The Same, Except In That Other World The Quantum Event Didn T Happen As You Read This, You Are Splitting Into Multiple Copies Of Yourself Thousands Of Times Per Second Step By Step In Carroll S Uniquely Lucid Way, He Sets Out The Major Objections To This Utterly Mind Blowing Notion Until His Case Is Inescapably EstablishedThe Holy Grail Of Modern Physics Is Reconciling Quantum Mechanics With Einstein S General Relativity His Theory Of Curved Spacetime Carroll Argues That Our Refusal To Face Up To The Mysteries Of Quantum Mechanics Has Blinded Us, And That Spacetime And Gravity Naturally Emerge From A Deeper Reality Called The Wave Function No Book For A Popular Audience Has Attempted To Make This Radical Argument We Re On The Threshold Of A New Way Of Understanding The Cosmos


10 thoughts on “Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime

  1. says:

    Scientific RevelationThere isthan a hint of theological method in modern physics Carroll confirms this in his insistence that quantum physics is, in his words, not an epistemic but an ontological discipline His claim is that current quantum theory is a description of the way the world really is not merely a way of understanding the world This is the traditional position of theologians who would like us all to consider God as the ultimate reality even if we find this reality to be not Scientific RevelationThere isthan a hint of theological method in modern physics Carroll confirms this in his insistence that quantum physics is, in his words, not an epistemic but an ontological discipline His claim is that current quantum theory is a description of the way the world really is not merely a way of understanding the world This is the traditional position of theologians who would like us all to consider God as the ultimate reality even if we find this reality to be not what we perceive it to be.In fact Carroll defines science in general, not just physics, in theological terms For him, the essential presumption of science is the intelligibility of the universe This implies not just that there is a pre existing order to be discovered but also that such order in some sense wants itself to be discovered These implications are precisely those of what is called fundamental theology, the study of how God can be known about at all The similarity between Carroll s view of quantum physics and fundamental theology is important because in both there is no distinction possible between epistemology and ontology How we know about the world, or God, is indistinguishable from what the world, or God, actually is Theology has a term for referring to this knowledge of being or Being revelation Essentially, you either get revelation or you don t It can t be argued about because the presuppositions about what constitute both existence and knowledge about existence are contained simultaneously within it.Thomas Aquinas is perhaps the most well known theologian to defend the presuppositions of revelation In doing so, his preferred approach is cosmological, that is, treating the entire universe as an entity to be explained in terms of its existence and its history At such a level of analysis, ordinary logic like that of cause and effect and their priority in time start to break down Thus, Aquinas asks, if every effect must have a cause, what is the ultimate cause And if human beings exhibit free will and purpose as an effect of that ultimate cause, is it not reasonable to attribute will and purpose to that cause QED, the universe is a consequence of divine action with some divine purpose toward which it is drawn.Carroll makes a parallel case for quantum physics and the Many Worlds theory of Hugh Everett, formulated in the 1950 s First, just like Aquinas, he adopts a cosmological position The universe, he says, is one vast quantum state, a wave function of enormous complexity This is not inconsistent with the theory of quantum physics even if it could never be empirically verified And it fits with the strange results of quantum experimentation QED, reality is composed 0f an indeterminate number of simultaneous universes In other words, Everett s theory qualifies as a revelation.If this is the case, then this wave function will evolve according to the mathematics of the Schr dinger equations, just as it has always done Not according to the logic of Newtonian or Aristotelian cause and effect but the logic of probability and entanglement This wave function is not something temporary or local that might transform into something else, say a particle, or collapse upon observation Within it is not only the universe we know about but an infinite number of others that exist simultaneously The wave function, in other words, is the very stuff, the ultimate reality of the universe and it doesn t make distinctions between observer and observed or between possible and actual Our brains and the farthest galaxies as well as everything in between, including any number of other worlds, must be part of this wave function, since there can be nothing else So the conventional Copenhagen interpretation, despite its usefulness, is wrong The wave function is the Alpha and the Omega, the source and giver of not just life but also existence, the Ground of Being as modern theologians like to say If it explicitly isn t called godly, it s only because the divine has suffered a significant reduction in brand value in recent centuries.That all sounds logically fine, ifthan a tad baroque But the reason it all sounds fine is the same reason that Aquinas sounds fine to the Pope Once ontology and epistemology are conflated, that is, when that which is is presumed to confirm that which we know, we have entered the realm of religion At that point, we simply assume a cosmological guarantor in what we take as revelation Revelation is its own assurance it proves itself And at that point Aquinas is about as credible as Carroll The most important Christian theologian of the 20th century, Karl Barth, devoted himself almost exclusively to this issue The intellectual machinations he had to employ in order to establish the intelligibility of God are really important for scientists like Carroll to consider before casually presuming an evendiffuse source of such an attribute.Postscript 16Sep19 Another view


  2. says:

    If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Pascal s Triangle Something Deeply Hidden Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime by Sean Carroll When a spin is measured, the wave function branches via decoherence according to the MWI , a single world splits into two and there are now two people where used to be just one It makes no sense to ask which one is really me Likewise, before the branching happens, it makes no sense to wonder which branch I will end up in If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Pascal s Triangle Something Deeply Hidden Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime by Sean Carroll When a spin is measured, the wave function branches via decoherence according to the MWI , a single world splits into two and there are now two people where used to be just one It makes no sense to ask which one is really me Likewise, before the branching happens, it makes no sense to wonder which branch I will end up in Both of them have every right to think of themselves as me The world duplicates, and everything within the world goes along with it In Something Deeply Hidden Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime by Sean Carroll Many Worlds is the most falsifiable theory ever invented In Something Deeply Hidden Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime by Sean CarrollLet me get this out of the way first Let me put forth the main 4 interpretations Continues elsewhere


  3. says:

    This book puts up an intellectual defense of the many worlds interpretation of Quantum Mechanics first proposed by Hugh Everett III in 1957 I was sold on this interpretation a long time ago but I like the way Carroll presents his case The Everettian view is the most conservative metaphysical view of quantum mechanics with the fewest ad hoc additions to squeeze the theory into our common sense notions Because of this, the conclusions of this conservative framework are the most counterintuitive This book puts up an intellectual defense of the many worlds interpretation of Quantum Mechanics first proposed by Hugh Everett III in 1957 I was sold on this interpretation a long time ago but I like the way Carroll presents his case The Everettian view is the most conservative metaphysical view of quantum mechanics with the fewest ad hoc additions to squeeze the theory into our common sense notions Because of this, the conclusions of this conservative framework are the most counterintuitive shocking commonsense so radically that many will balk at it The many worlds interpretation leads to the weird idea that every possible measurement of with a probability is realized in myriad branching realities when a quantum measurement takes place and all the time in the universe Carroll shows that the simplest assumption set leads to this conclusion and one may be tempted to dismiss this as repugnant but that is where the simplest understanding of QM leads Maybe it is a reductio absurdum and a bridge too far but commonsense has taken a beating in 20th and 21st century physics and mathematics maybe this time we might not want to listen to our gut Carroll also talks about a newer approach to quantum gravity In the past, we worked with relativity and tried to quantize it Carroll wants to start with quantum mechanics and quantum entanglement and try to get relativistic spacetime to fall out of it Approaching Quantum gravity from the quantum end rather than the gravity end Always enjoyed Carroll s popularizations and this one works for me as well as his others.Here is the author speaking for himself.https www.youtube.com watch v jHLfM


  4. says:

    TL DR Sean Carroll s Something Deeply Hidden tackles the difficult many worlds theories of quantum mechanics It s weird it s funny it s deeply philosophical and worth reading Highly recommended.Disclaimer I received a free copy of this as an ebook from the publisher in exchange for an honest review Find this and other reviews at my website Primmlife.com Review According to quantum mechanics, it s entirely possible that there are multiple copies of you reading multiple copies of this revie TL DR Sean Carroll s Something Deeply Hidden tackles the difficult many worlds theories of quantum mechanics It s weird it s funny it s deeply philosophical and worth reading Highly recommended.Disclaimer I received a free copy of this as an ebook from the publisher in exchange for an honest review Find this and other reviews at my website Primmlife.com Review According to quantum mechanics, it s entirely possible that there are multiple copies of you reading multiple copies of this review The many worlds approach to quantum mechanics says that the world decoheres into various branches Branching reality is a difficult subject, but it is one that makes sense when interpreting exactly what quantum physics represent Physicist, author, and podcaster, Sean Carroll attempts to explain these subtle and difficult philosophical questions in his latest book, Something Deeply Hidden, from Dutton This is a book of big ideas explained to an audience of anyone It doesn t spoon feed the reader answers, but nor does it put concepts too far out of reach For anyone interested in quantum mechanics, this is a must read Review Something Deeply Hidden I m a fan of Sean Carroll I like his podcasts and his appearances on Joe Rogan s podcast He s entertaining while still conveying complex knowledge So, this review is biased from the start I don t understand quantum mechanics, and for most of my studies, I ve been told I don t need to understand it because the math works It s an odd way to approach physics To quote Richard Feynman, I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics Certain physicists like Sean Carroll have decided to change that Something Deeply Hidden largely succeeds for our current best understanding It doesn t rely on the fact that the math works out it attempts to explain reality, which was physics original purpose.The book reads well it s not full of equations, though there are some Dr Carroll s style of explanation is clear enough without equations He s funny and fills the book with good examples and easy to follow illustrations Dr Carroll lays down a foundation of quantum mechanics history before moving onto cutting edge physics and then to the weird stuff Something Deeply Hidden is an intensely philosophical book that I m still thinking about.The book focuses on Schr dinger s equation and the Everettian interpretation, which is also known as the many worlds interpretation In short, Schr dinger s equation describes the wave function of the universe, and there is no collapsing of the equation Instead of superpositions collapsing into a measured reality, the measurement causes a branching of the universe Let me repeat that a branching of the universe One where outcome A happens and another where outcome B happens And guess what, we branch when the universe does as well The Many Worlds Interpretation Decoherence, branching, and superposition are difficult concepts to understand Honestly, I m not sure I grasp it fully Dr Carroll does a good job explaining it in a way that I could start to understand This is a book that I will have to reread The idea that the universe branches has long been a popular idea in science fiction see the TV show Sliders But it s muchcomplex than simply a person s decision causes the universe to split In fact, Dr Carroll deliberately debunks this idea The universe branches, but an individual s decision doesn t cause the branching.Dr Carroll explains the many worlds interpretation in plain terms that at the same time make you scratch your head In Chapter Seven, Dr Carroll writes a short story that s a dialogue between father and daughter physicists In a way, it reminded me of What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver This chapter was unexpected yet effective in conveying difficult topics around probability It was an odd chapter in a physics nonfiction book, but it helped convey the information Something Deeply Hidden is well written Part Three Something Deeply Hidden is organized into three parts with a prologue, epilogue, and appendix I kept up easily with part one part two stretched the limits of my intellect and part three simultaneously blew my mind and broke my brain I don t think I can adequately review this section without reading it again And I will definitely read it again In my review copy, one of the chapters in part three is titled, Breathing in Empty Space A chapter title like that deserves re reading Multiple Me s One consequence of branching is that when the universe decoheres and branches, so does the person In other words, there are many copies of each of us on various branches out in the multiverse Maybe Dr Carroll treats this as no big deal, and really after thinking about it for a while, it isn t Since we can t interact with these other branches, contemplating the other me s that exist is much the same as contemplating how many angels dance on the head of a pin But I never did shake the weirdness of me branching with the universe.This branching has direct consequences to conservation of energy and the concept of entropy I m not entirely convinced of the answer provided, but it s an interesting answer This is one of the rare moments in the book where I don t think the answer conveys a physical meaning Or, at the very least, one that I can understand If the universe branches enough, does that mean it s possible to lower the energy of the many worlds to almost zero If so, what happens to all the me s in those branches Competing Theories Dr Carroll states plainly that he subscribes to Hugh Everett III s interpretation of quantum mechanics But he does devote time to competing theories and gives them fair treatment Then, he explains why he thinks the alternate interpretations are wrong but in respectful manner Maybe I ve been reading too much politics lately, but this was really refreshing It s important to see a thoughtful summary of and argument against a competing philosophy without a need to win whatever that means in physics circles.This section also serves as a starter for investigatingabout the interpretation of quantum mechanics In this section, I learned the phrase quantum Bayesianism, which is just fun to say Dr Carroll s description is quite interesting, and I might look into the topic in the future Conclusion Sean Carroll s Something Deeply Hidden broke my brain in the best way possible This insightful, philosophical book explains difficult, complex concepts in understandable language Based on the arguments, I m now an Everettian convert Somewhere out in the multiverse, there s an Eric writing a better review of this book In a different branch, there s an Eric who didn t get to read this book, and he s all the poorer for it.9 out of 10


  5. says:

    Nature s review decades on, the theory is one of the most bizarre yet fully logical ideas in human history, growing directly out of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics without introducing extraneous elements It has become a staple of popular culture, although the plots of the many films and television series inspired by it invariably flout the theory by relying on contact between the parallel worlds, as in the 2011 movie Another Ea Nature s review decades on, the theory is one of the most bizarre yet fully logical ideas in human history, growing directly out of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics without introducing extraneous elements It has become a staple of popular culture, although the plots of the many films and television series inspired by it invariably flout the theory by relying on contact between the parallel worlds, as in the 2011 movie Another Earth.In Something Deeply Hidden, Carroll cogently explains the many worlds theory and its post Everett evolution, and why our world nevertheless looks the way it does Largely because of its purely logical character, Carroll calls Everett s brainchild the best view of reality we have Carroll argues that the many worlds theory is the most straightforward approach to understanding quantum mechanics It accepts the reality of the wave function In fact, it says that there is one wave function, and only one, for the entire Universe Further, it states that when an event happens in our world, the other possibilities contained in the wave function do not go away Instead, new worlds are created, in which each possibility is a reality The theory s sheer simplicity and logic within the conceptual framework of quantum mechanics inspire Carroll to call it the courageous approach Don t worry about those extra worlds, he asserts we can t see them, and if the many worlds theory is true, we won t notice the difference The many other worlds are parallel to our own, but so hidden from it that they might as well be populated by ghosts Something Deeply Hidden is aimed at non scientists, with a sidelong glance at physicists still quarrelling over the meaning of quantum mechanics Carroll brings the reader up to speed on the development of quantum physics from Max Planck to the present, and explains why it is so difficult to interpret, before expounding the many worlds theory Dead centre in the book is a Socratic dialogue about the theory s implications This interlude, between a philosophically sensitive physicist and a scientifically alert philosopher, is designed to sweep away intuitive reservations that non scientists might have


  6. says:

    This was definitely one of Carroll stechnical works While his language as always as simple as it can be for the layman, there s only a certainly level of simplicity to which quantum theory can be broken down That said, Carroll does good work interspersing all of the necessary technicalities with astory form description of the ideas behind quantum gravity, Many Worlds, and quantum physics, so if only half of the book sticks with you, you re still bound to learn something Carroll s This was definitely one of Carroll stechnical works While his language as always as simple as it can be for the layman, there s only a certainly level of simplicity to which quantum theory can be broken down That said, Carroll does good work interspersing all of the necessary technicalities with astory form description of the ideas behind quantum gravity, Many Worlds, and quantum physics, so if only half of the book sticks with you, you re still bound to learn something Carroll s trademark humor, too, shines through in a lot of places, and serves as a good anchor point to bring even the most baffled reader back from the brink Definitely not for beginners to the ideas behind quantum theory, but an excellent book to build on what a fan of popsci might already know


  7. says:

    Something Deeply Hidden is that rare science nonfiction book that s both easy to understand and incredibly complex This is quantum mechanics like you ve never seen, laid out in an understandable fashion With a combination of history, basic explanations, and visual aids that simplify its complexities, Carroll presents an essential guide to this mysterious field I ll admit I was nervous as I started reading the book At first glance, the subject matter seems too dense for a basic human without Something Deeply Hidden is that rare science nonfiction book that s both easy to understand and incredibly complex This is quantum mechanics like you ve never seen, laid out in an understandable fashion With a combination of history, basic explanations, and visual aids that simplify its complexities, Carroll presents an essential guide to this mysterious field I ll admit I was nervous as I started reading the book At first glance, the subject matter seems too dense for a basic human without any scientific background As you read, it slowly starts to make sense until you re nodding along at things you never thought you d learn One of the most fascinating aspects of the book is the history behind quantum physics and how it came to be It s nearly impossible to imagine a group of people coming up with these kinds of theories but here we are.Above all, you ll learn so many things about the mysteries of the universe I continue to have trouble wrapping my head around this fascinating field of science but I feel a big step closer after reading this thoughtfully written guide to everything quantum mechanics.NOTE I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest, unbiased review


  8. says:

    Ever since we lost Stephen Hawking in 2018 there has been a gap in the public s perception of science, specifically that relating to theoretical physics, as to who the darn smartest person in the world is Allow me to suggest that this public persona be taken up by Sean Carroll, theoretical physicist and professor at CIT In the scientifically illiterate yet dramatically compelling blockbuster film Armageddon, there is a moment where a NASA researcher, Dr Quincy, is introduced as the smarte Ever since we lost Stephen Hawking in 2018 there has been a gap in the public s perception of science, specifically that relating to theoretical physics, as to who the darn smartest person in the world is Allow me to suggest that this public persona be taken up by Sean Carroll, theoretical physicist and professor at CIT In the scientifically illiterate yet dramatically compelling blockbuster film Armageddon, there is a moment where a NASA researcher, Dr Quincy, is introduced as the smartest person on the planet, you might want to listen to what he has to say The testosterone junky infused insipidness of that film aside, that is precisely the introduction I would give to Professor Carroll Where his previous volume, The Big Picture, tackled many of the most common BIG questions about existence and provided a wealth of information with which to deal in these topics, his latest work, Something Deeply Hidden, a quote from Einstein, is an impassioned cri de coeur for the Many Worlds Everett approach to quantum mechanics Long relegated to the fringe of non specific meanderings in conversations that featurealcohol than coherent thought, this theory is one which Carroll makes a strong case for becoming part of mainstream discourse on the nature of reality Along the way to making his case for Everettian many world concepts, he also happens to have written the most lucid, honest, and readable account of quantum mechanics yet completed and yes, I am including Richard Feynman in that assessment He would say this is due to the fact that this theory provides, counter to popular notions, the simplest and most elegant resolution to the hard problems of quantum mechanics I would say this is mostly due to his singular rhetorical abilities and brilliance of formulation The absolute highlight of the work is a fictional dialogue between a young physics PHD and her inquisitive father which presents nearly all of the intuitive biases against this interpretation, and very humbly yet thoroughly knocks them all out of the park This chapter alone merits several re readings as does the entire work Given that this book and his previous are my two favorite works in this area I have to say I recommend his work to you with no reservation This is complex material but it has NEVER beenclearly presented and approachable for the enthusiastic layman


  9. says:

    As per usual with Sean Carroll s books, they are incredibly witty, well structured and well written and this one is no exception While this book is about the Many Worlds theory of quantum mechanics or Everett formulation , other formulations are discussed in some detail as well Persuasively, Carroll relabels the Everett Formulation as Austere Quantum Mechanics , with a view to focusing on wave functions or quantum states as the reality of a quantum system without importing assumptions that a As per usual with Sean Carroll s books, they are incredibly witty, well structured and well written and this one is no exception While this book is about the Many Worlds theory of quantum mechanics or Everett formulation , other formulations are discussed in some detail as well Persuasively, Carroll relabels the Everett Formulation as Austere Quantum Mechanics , with a view to focusing on wave functions or quantum states as the reality of a quantum system without importing assumptions that are not required to explain quantum phenomena However, this review is four star because I think Chapter 5 on entanglement was too lightly treated in comparison to the heavy reliance on this concept later in the book To say in Many Worlds language that measurement branches the wave function as opposed to collapsing the wave function in the text book formulations is really the point or main thread of the book and yet even so in later chapters I was not convinced how a Many Worlds formulation adds anything different as compared to the text book formulation involving collapsed wave functions In that sense, I found a discontinuity between the first and second halves of the book Overall, however, I enjoyed the book and look forward to Carroll s new textbook on Quantum Mechanics to be published soon


  10. says:

    I normally give Sean Carroll s books five stars, but this one missed the mark for me I liked the joke about Heisenberg being stopped for speeding, but the other stuff seemed mor like philosophy than physics The many worlds model is so far out there that I couldn t believe it It might be because I just don t understand how wave functions work I didn t get the idea of wave functions branching It could be that this level of physics just doesn t translate into pop science.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *